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Starting a Small Business in Berkshire and How We Can Help

Posted on September 17, 2019 by Peter Donaldson
Starting a Small Business in Berkshire and How We Can Help

Starting your own small business is a mixture of excitement and possibly uneasiness because it’s breaking new ground. It’s a case of fear of failure and success, as they’re both different sides of the same coin for anyone new to it. Despite this, starting and running your own enterprise can be a very rewarding experience, and you’ll be the boss.

The Camp Hopson team are big fans of people who venture out into the small business world, and we’re on hand to provide any assistance we can. We work with hundreds of entrepreneurs and SMEs every year in Berkshire and throughout the South of England. Camp Hopson’s removals and storage services have transferrable functions that will help any new small business.

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The Best Pubs in Berkshire & Surrounding Areas

Posted on June 23, 2017 by Peter Donaldson
The Best Pubs in Berkshire

Berkshire has some wonderful places to eat and drink and if you’re new to the area there’s no better way to get acquainted than a few pints in some of Berkshire’s finest pubs. This is Camp Hopson’s short guide to Berkshire’s best pubs – perfect for newbies to Newbury and Berkshire and it can also be a great suggestion to people who already live here.

Newbury is a fantastic place to live and there are some unique pubs where you can enjoy a few pints or a glass of wine this summer. From traditional English pubs to gastro pubs, our list will try to give you an informed and varied choice when you’re looking for somewhere to go at the weekend.

If you’re looking for a mixture of traditional country pub and eatery as well as fine dining and a range of wines and spirits, then the Dunas Arms in Kintbury is a must, and it’s not too far outside of Newbury. If you fancy something a bit more down to earth with a good choice of ales then we suggest you try the Roebuck Restaurant in Reading. With many noting the Roebuck’s friendly staff and its wide selection of ales and beer, it could be Berkshire’s best kept secret.

Closer to home we suggest you visit the Starting Gate Restaurant in Newbury. It’s a great place to bring the family and you’ll want to go back after you’ve enjoyed their customer service. Great value for money and great food and there’s two pool tables and some darts available. For a change of scenery and a menu which includes the best selection of venison dishes in Berkshire, you should venture to the Pot Kiln in Yattendon. This quaint restaurant and pub serve up food that you won’t find anywhere else and you can get some quality West Berkshire Brewery ale on tap.

The Wellington Arms in Hampshire is another place that serves up some unexpected treats. You can buy homemade honey, fresh eggs and their own reared chickens at the bar, which you definitely won’t be able to do in many other pubs. The ambience is comfortable, the food is lovely and the drinks available will suit everyone’s tastes. Our final destination on our list is a bit different – sometimes you want to be able to enjoy yourself and have somewhere to stay. If you’re new to the area or you’re in the process of house-hunting then the Yew Tree Inn in Newbury is well worth checking in. Their food is so good that they have been awarded two Rosettes by the AA.

Newbury is a great place to live and if you’re planning on moving to the area we would make a suggestion of visiting Newbury a few times to help you find the most suitable home for you and your family. And when you do start planning your move you should contact Camp Hopson.

At Camp Hopson, we’ve assembled a highly trained team of experts who have years of experience with helping people move to their new home in Newbury and we cover all of Berkshire. We’re not only Berkshire’s favourite movers – we offer storage from as little as £13 per week and we have a variety of storage options to suit everyone’s needs.

Camp Hopson’s ethos is to work with closely with our customers to ensure the can help them get the service they need and we guarantee that your possessions will be safe and secure when you store them with us.

Contact us today to discuss your requirements.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The advantages and disadvantages of Victorian houses in Berkshire

Posted on April 2, 2017 by Peter Donaldson
Victorian houses in Berkshire

If you’ve always lived in something modern (ie 1950s onwards), you may yearn to live in a house that has some history – and for many people, that’s only true of Victorian or earlier. Some people are more flexible and will include the more recent Edwardian properties. There’s something utilitarian, however, about modern flats and houses, and although they have their advantages, soul isn’t always one of them. But you should also prepare for some challenges in an older house, so let’s take a closer look at the Victorian era and see what its houses have and haven’t got going for them.

Advantages are, thankfully, plentiful and here are just some of them:

  1. Handsome architecture – in the mid/late-19th century, there was a considerable interest in reviving earlier styles, with some influences also coming from the Middle East and Asia. The medieval Gothic style was another inspiration for Victorian architects, and all of it adds up to one of the most characterful periods in the history of the country’s buildings.
  1. High ceilings – who doesn’t sigh with relief at the thought of plenty of headspace after they’ve had years of being boxed in by rooms barely over seven feet high?
  1. Fireplaces – standard in many Victorian homes, there’s just nothing like a fireplace for making your living space an absolute haven from the outside world.
  1. Sash windows – if you’ve lived with soulless modern windows with plastic frames, a sash window will be like a breath of fresh air. Alas, that might be literal fresh air because they’re not quite as efficient at keeping the elements out, and you could struggle with getting permission if you want double-glazing or any kind of replacement.
  1. Attractive details like coving, cornices and ceiling roses. Ceiling roses gained popularity during the Georgian era and maintained it through several subsequent periods, including the Victorian.
  1. Thick walls – you’re less likely to hear your neighbours or be bothered by their piano-playing, music and general living noise.

 

Disadvantages include:

  1. Wind and cold getting in more easily.
  2. Gardens getting less direct sunlight because the buildings are taller than modern ones.
  3. DIY and upkeep always more complicated – these houses have had to withstand all the changes in the ways we administrate utilities and plumbing.
  4. High ceilings pose decorating challenges that are decidedly complex.
  5. Walls are less precisely structured, so lining up wallpaper is more difficult.
  6. Problems like dry rot are more prevalent.

Eco-friendly Decorating

Posted on January 13, 2017 by Peter Donaldson
Eco-friendly Decorating

If you’ve moved to Berkshire and are on the verge of decorating or redecorating a new home, then doing it the eco-friendly way is a fitting choice, especially if you’ve moved from city to countryside. Making your Berkshire home a lovely place to be while simultaneously being kind to Mother Nature is the way more and more people are going. Joining them doesn’t have to be a slog. Even if your home is partially eco-friendly, that’s going to be better than not at all.

  1. Re-everything. From reclaiming to recycling, reusing and repurposing, if you can get the prefix ‘re’ on to it, then so much the better. A bit of DIY know-how here and there means you can create new items out of old. You can spruce up previously owned items from second-hand shops and find hidden treasure in skips and scrapyards. At the same time, you’ll be bringing real personality into your home instead of tepid, identikit auras. Whether it’s a coffee table or a headboard, if it’s reclaimed and restored, you’re being planet-conscious.
  2. Try to determine whether any new wood you might need has been sourced ethically. There are bodies such as the FSC (Forest Stewardship Council) which give approval to some products and not to others. As long as you’re not contributing to deforestation, you’re on the right track, and it’s possible to work this out as you go along.
  3. Indoor Nature. Freshen up your home with indoor plants as much as you can. The air in every room will benefit, and the sight is relaxing, homely and sensual. Plants combat the bad effects of air conditioning as well as diminishing pollutants and releasing oxygen. There’ll be less carbon dioxide in your home and everyone wins.
  4. Stay aware of what your friends and neighbours are doing, so that when they throw things away, you can retrieve them. Most people prefer to pass items on rather than consign them to landfills and dumps. And if you yourself are chucking stuff, use neighbours, charity shops and online auctions rather than the rubbish bin.
  5. Go local. Using suppliers and companies nearby has a positive impact on the community. There’ll be a smaller carbon footprint in your wake because the goods won’t have to travel as far to reach you and you’ll also be spreading money around in the immediate community.

Camp Hopson Hungerford

Posted on August 31, 2016 by Peter Donaldson
Moving To Hungerford

Within the county of Berkshire lies the quaint and pretty market town of Hungerford. It’s a place with which we’ve built of a long-standing relationship; in fact, our fondness for this area, as we go to and fro doing our removals, is boundless. We’re delighted that we’re the town’s favourite choice for removals work and it’s with pleasure that we move happy clients in and around the area. Hungerford’s a mere 67 miles from London, and also no great distance from Salisbury, Newbury and Marlborough. It’s well connected, with a railway station that’s on the London-Exeter route. You can board a train at Waterloo and be here in no time at all. Two significant rivers run through the town and they are the River Kennet and the River Dun. 

Although Hungerford isn’t mentioned in the Domesday Book (1086), it can be traced back to at least 1173. By the end of the 14th century, the place was overseen by John of Gaunt. Not long after, the ennobled Hungerford family were in the driving seat, although they subsequently moved to Wiltshire.

In more recent times, Hungerford has gone through difficult ordeals but today it has emerged as lovely as ever. There’s a thriving food festival and a well-attended and well-liked literary festival, too. There’s a bustling and respected antiques scene here – particularly useful if you’re making a house-move and want the kind of understated beauty that only antique furniture can provide. Stroll down Bridge Street, sometimes dubbed the ‘Bond Street of Berkshire’ and you’ll find the most upmarket part of the Hungerford shopping scene. There’s a department store bringing together some of the best independent retailers in the area and, at the Bear Hotel, you can take a break for lunch or coffee. This street is an absolute haven of interesting must-visits, including Bridge Street Antiques, Angela Knight Lingerie, Styles Silver, William Cook Antiques, and the car dealership, Peter Stirland Ford. For people about to tie the knot and enter a phase of marital bliss, Miss of Hungerford can provide wedding dresses possessed of an utterly exquisite charm. This year, on the 17th of December, Hungerford will host a special late-night shopping event, so let’s all mark that date in our diaries right now.

But if consumerism isn’t your bag, then the area is also renowned for the beautiful walks you can set out on in the nearby countryside. Visit www.hungerford.co.uk to find out about that and much, much more.

The Royal County of Berkshire

Posted on August 23, 2016 by Peter Donaldson
Berkshire

The Royal County of Berkshire has been luring Londoners away from the capital for centuries with its mix of luscious countryside, bustling towns and picture-postcard villages. Whether you’ve just arrived or you’ve been around for a little while, it’s worth having your finger on the pulse of your adoptive home and making sure you don’t miss out on any of its attributes, goings on or dazzling attractions.

  1. If you’re keen to look into the past of the county – perhaps you’re a history buff or a keen genealogist – then you won’t want to overlook the Berkshire Records Office  where almost nine centuries of history is held in the form of documents and photographs. Perhaps you have ancient links to the county just waiting to be uncovered and celebrated.
  1. Visit South East England has a dedicated Berkshire page  and sometimes the best way to get the most out of where you live is to try to see it like a visitor or holidaymaker instead of a blasé, seen-it-all-before resident. This is also a very useful resource should you be expecting guests and are therefore required to think of interesting local things to do.
  1. To stay abreast of local news, opinion, sport and entertainment, bookmark online paper, Local Berkshire [localberkshire.co.uk], The Reading Chronicle [readingchronicle.co.uk], the Windsor & Eton Express [windsorexpress.co.uk] and the Windsor Observer [windsorobserver.co.uk]. There’s a number of other local papers serving the county, all of which can be found online easily.
  2. Rambling as a pastime was injected with a degree of cool some years ago when prominent fans of the activity like Janet Street-Porter began coming out of the rambling closet and talking about what once had been considered a terribly passé and slightly embarrassing hobby. There are few better ways to explore your surroundings to the fullest and you can find out about the nine different Berkshire rambling groups